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FSTREATSUC (FSTREATSUC)
Whether fistula treatment was successful

Codes and Frequencies



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Description

FSTREATSUC indicates whether the fistula treatment for the woman was successful in curing the condition. Codes and question wording vary across surveys. See Comparability.

When children are chosen as the unit of analysis, the woman respondent indicates the mother of the child.

Comparability — Index

GENERAL
Benin
Burkina Faso
Chad
Mali
Niger

Comparability

Along with universe differences, FSTREATSUC has differences in coding and question wording. Some surveys asked whether treatment "stopped the problem" and divided "yes" responses between partial success ("still some leakage") and full success ("no leakage"). Others used a simple yes/no response to the question about treatment success. To maximize comparability, IPUMS-DHS uses composite coding, with all affirmative responses sharing a common first digit of 2 and with additional detail distinguished in the second digit.

Some surveys asked about the success of treatment generally. Others asked about the success of a particular kind of treatment (such as surgery in a modern medical center).

Comparability - Standard DHS

FSTREATSUC is not included in any phase of the standard DHS questionnaire, but it is included in both phases (for use with Phases VI and VII of the standard questionnaire) of the module on fistula. In both phases, the standard wording is, "Did the treatment stop the leakage completely? IF NO: Did the treatment reduce the leakage?"

Comparability — Benin [top]

The Benin 2011 survey text includes two branching questions, with the first asking if the treatment stopped leakage completely and the second asking if the treatment reduced leakage.

Comparability — Burkina Faso [top]

The Burkina Faso 2010 survey includes two branching questions, with the first asking if the treatment stopped leakage completely and the second asking if the treatment reduced leakage.

Comparability — Chad [top]

The 2014 Chad survey includes two branching questions, with the first asking if the treatment stopped leakage completely and the second asking if the treatment reduced leakage.

Comparability — Mali [top]

For the Mali 2006 survey, FSTREATSUC refers to the success of surgical treatment for fistula in a modern medical center.

The 2012 Mali survey provides two branching questions, with the first asking if the treatment stopped leakage completely and the second asking if the treatment reduced leakage.

Comparability — Niger [top]

The Niger 2006 and 2012 survey forms refer to the success of surgical treatment for fistula in a modern medical facility.

Universe

  • Afghanistan 2015: Ever-married women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Benin 2011: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Burkina Faso 2010: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Chad 2014: Women age 15-49, in households not selected for the men's survey, who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Ethiopia 2016: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and who had surgery to treat it.
  • Guinea 2012: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Guinea 2018: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Kenya 2014: Women age 15-49, in households selected for the long questionnaire, who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Malawi 2010: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Malawi 2016: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Mali 2006: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and had a modern medical treatment with surgery.
  • Mali 2012: Women age 15-49 who sought treatment for a fistula that followed a delivery, sexual assault, pelvic surgery, or other event
  • Mali 2018: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Niger 2006: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and had a modern medical treatment with surgery.
  • Niger 2012: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and who had surgery to treat it.
  • Nigeria 2008: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Nigeria 2018: Women age 15-49 in households not selected for hemoglobin measurement, who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Senegal 2010: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Tanzania 2010: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Uganda 2016: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Yemen 2013: Ever-married women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Zambia 2018: Women age 15-49 who have experienced a fistula and sought treatment.
  • Afghanistan: 2015-C, 2015-W, 2015-B
  • Benin: 2011-W, 2011-C, 2011-B
  • Burkina Faso: 2010-W, 2010-C, 2010-B
  • Chad: 2014-W, 2014-C, 2014-B
  • Ethiopia: 2016-W, 2016-C, 2016-B
  • Guinea: 2012-W, 2012-C, 2012-B, 2018-C, 2018-B, 2018-W
  • Kenya: 2014-W, 2014-C, 2014-B
  • Malawi: 2010-W, 2010-C, 2010-B, 2016-W, 2016-C, 2016-B
  • Mali: 2006-W, 2006-C, 2006-B, 2012-W, 2012-C, 2012-B, 2018-C, 2018-B, 2018-W
  • Niger: 2006-W, 2006-C, 2006-B, 2012-W, 2012-C, 2012-B
  • Nigeria: 2008-W, 2008-C, 2008-B, 2018-C, 2018-B, 2018-W
  • Senegal: 2010-B, 2010-W, 2010-C
  • Tanzania: 2010-B, 2010-W, 2010-C
  • Uganda: 2016-W, 2016-C, 2016-B
  • Yemen: 2013-B, 2013-W, 2013-C
  • Zambia: 2018-W, 2018-C, 2018-B